Skin fungus on dogs

Using Dog Drool for Athlete's Foot Provokes Controversy Home Remedy

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Q. Our Westie has cleared up my athlete's foot completely. The sensation was a little odd at first as the dog licked both my feet. Still, it's better than suffering with this fungal infection. This worked better than the creams and potions I've bought over the years. Has anyone else ever had this experience?

A. Dog lovers have written in from time to time with testimonials like yours. The first one we received stated: "My uncle had his athlete's foot cured by his small terrier dog back in the 50s. When my uncle came home in the evenings, he would remove his shoes and socks and put his feet on a hassock while reading the paper. The dog always went to him immediately and licked his feet all over, especially between the toes. After about three months, he noticed that the athlete's foot which had plagued him for most of his adult life had gone away!"

Although dog saliva may have some anti-fungal properties, dogs often carry a variety of bacteria in their mouths, which could be a problem if saliva got on broken skin.

A vet tech added that, "Not only is this 'treatment' ridiculous, it could be dangerous to your pet! Dogs and cats are can get fungal infections from human carriers. Not only that, but they can also transfer the same fungi back to you, other people and other pets.

"Treating pets for fungal infections can be costly and time consuming. If you love your furry friend and want to keep him/her healthy, please don't recommend this remedy."

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Source: www.peoplespharmacy.com

Found an article on ringworm for those who

2005-05-03 10:17:35 by pantherkitten9

Are interested:
is a skin disease of warm-blooded mammals properly termed "Dermatomycosis." It can be a major problem in multiple animal households and kennels/catteries. It is caused by a fungus-type organism. It is not a "worm!"
The fungus lives in the outer layers of skin, hair shafts, and toe nails. It invades the hair follicles damaging the actual hair itself. The hairs become fragile and break easily. As the infection progresses, more and more hair may be lost.
After appropriate treatment, the hair will grow back though sometimes discolored

What kind of dog?

2007-12-20 21:07:16 by frequentrider

If it's a dog that's lower to the ground and his belly is rubbing thus the chaffing, then a dog sweater will help the problem. There's thin ones for summer and thick ones for winter. You also need to HONESTLY evaluate your dog's weight; is he is overweight, that would definitely not help with his belly dragging the ground, among other things. You need to get him on a diet ASAP not just because of his chaffing, but for quality of life, longevity, reduced blood pressure and pressure on his lungs, etc.
Stick your thumbs on the middle of his back and your fingers down the side on his ribs

Dog allergy/mange question(long)

2012-01-19 08:38:23 by AskDeeMarie

Hello,
Since your friends dog has been scratching for months and has two other dogs without any similar issues it is extremely unlikely it is mange. It is very possible that the dog has an allergy to something, including the food, even though the dog has had no issues in the past. Like people, animals can become allergic to bugs, food, or pollutants suddenly at any point of their lives without being allergic to those things in the past. Dogs usually show their first signs of allergies anywhere from 10mths old to 4 years old, however food allergies can appear at any age during the dogs life

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